Nature Of Things

Nature Of Things

Celebration of the ephemeral material has turned into a developing installation. From the decay – which became its inherent element – an alternative universe has emerged. Within its realm the process of degradation and rotting gains the qualities of progression. Objects displayed at a different stages of decomposition, reference domestic and architectural forms. When displayed in the context of permanent matter such as discarded metal, one is stunned to find in them a common quality. Now more than ever, metal proves to be impermanent. With is corroded parts, rusted arms and crumbling joints – it shares a similar beauty – complementing this unstable universe. 

You circulate through the installation which embraces you, allowing to reflect upon the contemporary consumerism culture, while continually exposing and celebrating the processes of decay, destruction, renewal and reconstruction. The overall experience pushes you towards this uncomfortable desire of wanting to preserve this fluctuating universe.

But this time the artist offers no  such solution, no relief. Sight of the familiar glass box gives you a glare of hope but quickly dies as you notice the corrupted vases within. Instead of building an incubator which could preserve and stop the progressing decay, the artist created an environment in which bacteria thrives. A compact microenvironment creates a stable and controlled conditions which allows you to study the progressing decay, while increasing the kinetics of the decomposing vases. Once again this manually controlled habitat becomes a space for experimentation – where the different processes can be studied, slowed down and expedited. Objects within this humid incubator, are exposed and extremely vulnerable to the elements such as diffused bacteria and enzymes which accelerate the processes of disintegration and decay. Captured behind the thick glass, objects are exhibited to the public eye in their most vulnerable state. Their refined form becomes corrupted and flesh like. On our eyes it changes becoming pale and fuzzy. Covered with a moss like fungus, if begins to resemble half eaten fruit, rather than the former object. Yet somehow in this intimate moment we manage to find an intricate beauty – a meeting point between the past, present and the future.